About Prescription Stimulants (Ritalin)

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What can prescription stimulants feel like?

Depending on how you chose to take a prescription stimulant (ie. orally or snorting), the effects can start from 1-30 minutes and can last for 3-8 hours. How they make you feel depends on how much you take, how often you take it, which drug you use (ie. Adderall, Ritalin) and your individual body. When used as prescribed, these drugs can cause increased alertness and concentration. When used in larger doses they can result in euphoria, excessive energy, racing heart and seizures.

It is important to remember that prescription stimulants come in different doses and different types are not all dosed the same. It can be difficult to tell what dose a counterfeit stimulant contains.

Remember a low dose for one person can be a high dose for another, as people’s bodies process drugs differently.

 

Pleasant Effects 

Unpleasant Effects 

Happiness

Social confidence

Talkativeness

Increased concentration

Hypervigilance

Euphoria

Increased sex drive

 

Teeth grinding

Loss of appetite

Frequent urge to pee

Fast heartbeat

Difficulty falling asleep

Dry mouth

Stomachache

Headache

Mood swings

Anxiety

Difficulty controlling impulses

Pleasant Effects 

Unpleasant Effects 

Intense focus on a task

Increased euphoria

Increased sociability

Insomnia

Irregular heartbeat

Increased blood pressure

Intense anxiety

Intense mood swings

Impaired judgement

Paranoia

Shortness of breath or changes to breathing

Pleasant Effects 

Unpleasant Effects 

 

Seizures

Psychosis

Heart attack

Stroke

Difficulty breathing

Loss of consciousness

A Reddit user wrote about their experience using a prescription stimulant to study:

“It did allow for more productivity and gave a feeling of reward for doing otherwise useless tasks. But outside of the one task I was doing, my humanness was diminished.”

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