If a sample has been sent for follow-up testing, you can use the Unique ID code that you were given to find out the results here.

Call the New Zealand Drug Foundation if you want to anonymously talk through these results on (04) 801 6303, or email drugchecking@drugfoundation.org.nz

This page currently only has the results of follow-up testing at drug checking clinics run by the NZ Drug Foundation and the NZ Needle Exchange Programme.

 
There may be some delays with testing samples, so follow-up testing results may take a while to appear. Please check back if you can't find your sample on this page. Thanks for your patience.

May 2024

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 28th May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with caffeine and sugar

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 28th May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no filler

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 28th May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no filler

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine 

Date brought in for testing: 23rd May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine with no filler.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cocaine. 

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine 

Date brought in for testing: 21st of May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Levamisole

Levamisole is a common binder that's usually found in cocaine. It does not have any psychoactive effects (taking it won't give you a high). In rare cases, levamisole can cause blood and skin conditions, especially in large amounts. We recommend avoiding injecting Levamisole as it can cause complications. If you feel unwell, or have lesions appear on your skin (especially cheeks and ears) seek medical help immediately. 

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 20th May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no filler

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: Not Stated

Date brought in for testing: 16th of May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: GBL with nothing else present.

GBL is stronger than GHB. Because of this, GBL should be dosed lower than what would normally be taken for GHB.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using GBL.

Substance Presumed to be: Bromazolam

Date brought in for testing: First week of May

Substances detected in the sample: (Preliminary result) N-Desethyletonitazene

Please note: The final result for this sample is still being reviewed by the laboratory, and is subject to change. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended, for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

We did not detect diazepam in this sample. The only substance identified was desethyletonitazene, a very potent novel opioid drug. Desethyletonitazene may be up to 10 times as potent as fentanyl.

Fentanyl test strips will not detect the presence of a nitazene. You can now pre-order Nitazene testing strips from The Level. Different nitazenes can have dramatically different potencies, including when injected versus taken orally (can be exponentially more potent when taken intravenously). Nitazenes are associated with high degrees of harm in NZ, including hospitalisation and death. Both opioid-naïve and opioid-experienced clients are highly at risk of overdose or death from nitazenes. Volumetric dosing can be particularly challenging with nitazenes due to differences in solubility compared with other opioids, and is not necessarily an easy way to reduce risks when taking nitazenes. 

Opioid overdose is life-threatening and often fatal. If you choose to take this substance, know the signs of overdose: slow/shallow/no breathing, blue lips/fingertips, tiny / unresponsive pupils of the eye. We strongly recommend having naloxone (opioid overdose antidote) on hand – you can obtain a kit from your local Needle Exchange Provider . Multiple doses of naloxone may be required to reverse an overdose, and it may wear off before the effect of the opioid does, leading to recurrence of overdose. It is important to remain with a person who has overdosed after administering Naloxone to ensure they are ok and to provide support if overdose does reoccur. We strongly recommend having multiple naloxone ampoules or doses of Nyxoid (nasal spray) if you intend to take nitazenes, and strongly advise calling 111 for an ambulance in addition to naloxone administration if overdose occurs. 

Overdose and death and dramatically more likely in combination with other depressants: alcohol, opioids, benzodiazepines, dissociatives, G/1,4-BD. Especially, novel benzos with long half-lives (e.g. bromazolam) taken in the last few days are significantly more likely to contribute to overdose from nitazenes. Nitazenes should not be taken alone – a trusted friend who knows the dosage a person has taken, route of administration, other drugs consumed, signs of overdose and naloxone administration should be present to provide first aid and seek medical support if needed. You won’t get in trouble for calling an ambulance – they only want to ensure you are safe and breathing.

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 2nd May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no filler

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

 

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine 

Date brought in for testing: 2nd May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Ketamine with no filler 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Ketamine

Substance presumed to be: GHB

Date brought in for testing: 2nd May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: 2,2-thiodiethanol and 1,4 BD 

Thiodiethanol is an industrial solvent that is unsafe to ingest and can cause serious harm. It is recommended that this substance is not consumed.

1,4 BD is a drug similar to GBL/GBH but it has a slower onset, and lasts longer. It is recommended that when taking 1,4 BD, you space out any re-dosing longer than you usually would for GHB or GBL. 

Please contact us on The Level if you have questions about this sample. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using GHB or GBL. 

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: First week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine - no filler detected. 

This sample was consistent with the presence of methamphetamine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

We see a lot of methamphetamine samples which are consistent with the presence of methamphetamine only, but which produce weak or unexpected effects, which can feel similar to a sample which has been substituted or adulterated. We couldn’t detect any filler or adulterant in this sample, and we suspect this effect is most likely to be due to differences in precursors and synthesis methods, which produce different amounts of L-meth versus D-meth (the psychoactive isomer). We’re working to improve our technology to tell this difference, and will update this result once the laboratory has been able to determine the chemical handedness of this sample.

We wrote an article last year with KnowYourStuffNZ explaining some of these differences – have a read here and feel free to return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended to check on this result for updates. 

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking methamphetamine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

 

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: Second week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Caffeine

Caffeine is a legal stimulant drug, which can cause wakefulness and euphoria, but also carries risk of side effects including anxiety. Some people can be allergic to caffeine, and in some combinations with other drugs, caffeine can increase your risk of side effects including brain toxicity. We recommend taking care and having a plan for if something goes wrong when taking caffeine with other drugs.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

 

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: First week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: No opioid or benzo-type drug. 

Please note: The final result for this sample is still being reviewed by the laboratory, and is subject to change. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended, for additional advice to keep you and your community safer.

Laboratory analysis shows no nitazene-type substances, fentanyl-type substances or benzodiazepines were detected. 

Analysis results for this sample showed a substance, which could possibly be pirfenidone. Due to technical limitations, we are unable to conclusively identify this substance. If someone chooses to take this substance, we recommend doing plenty of research, and consulting a medical professional to identify any risks, including interaction with other medications you may be taking.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: First week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: No opioid or benzo-type drug. 

Please note: The final result for this sample is still being reviewed by the laboratory, and is subject to change. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended, for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

Laboratory analysis shows no nitazene-type substances, fentanyl-type substances or benzodiazepines were detected. 

Analysis results for this sample showed a substance, which could possibly be pirfenidone. Due to technical limitations, we are unable to conclusively identify this substance. If someone chooses to take this substance, we recommend doing plenty of research, and consulting a medical professional to identify any risks, including interaction with other medications you may be taking.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine 

Date brought in for testing: 10th of May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine with no filler 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Methamphetamine. 

Substance presumed to be: 5-HO-DMT 

Date brought in for testing: 10th May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine and  5-Methoxy-N,N-tetramethylenetryptamine

Our equipment was not able to differentiate what novel tryptamine was in this drug, so it is possible it is a different one to 5-Methoxy-N,N-tetramethylenetryptamine. However 5-Methoxy-N,N-tetramethylenetryptamine is active in very low doses, and can cause intense effects such as amnesia, vomiting and extreme confusion. It is recommended if you do choose to take this, to stick with very low doses.

This sample also contained methamphetamine. The combination of these two drugs is likely to make for unpleasant and unpredictable effects. 

Please feel free to contact us on The Level if you have questions about these sample results. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Methamphetamine. 

Substance presumed to be: LSD

Date brought in for testing: 10th of May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: LSD 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using LSD. 

Substance presumed to be: GBL

Date brought in for testing: 10th of May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: GBL

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using GBL. 

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine 

Date brought in for testing: 10th of May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Ephedrine, Caffeine and Sugar 

This sample was not found to contain any cocaine. It did contain ephedrine- a prescription cold medicine that acts as a stimulant as well as caffeine and sugar.

Mixing stimulants such as ephedrine and caffeine can put extra strain on your body, which can be dangerous. If you choose to take this substance, it is recommended to stick with lower doses, and not to take with other stimulants, including coffee or other caffeinated drinks. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using prescription stimulants, such as pseudoephedrine. 

Substance presumed to be: Flubromazolam 

Date brought in for testing: 10th of May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Diethylene Glycol (anti-freeze) and possible fentanyl 

Initial testing in clinic of this sample found it to contain an unknown substance and possible fentanyl. Further testing by NZDF found that this contained anti-freeze, which is a dangerous substance to consume and can result in organ damage or death. 

Update: 22nd May 2024

Results are back from further laboratory testing.

Substances detected from further testing: 1,2 Propanediol (propylene glycol) and traces of flubromazolam. Propylene Glycol is a food additive that has no psychoactive effects (will not give you a high). It can cause complications if ingested in large quantities.

No fentanyl was detected.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA 

Date brought in for testing: 9th of May, 2024 

This sample has been sent to the laboratory for further testing and these results will be updated. 

Update: 22nd May 2024

Results are back from further laboratory testing.

Substances detected from further testing: MDMA. No other substances detected.

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine 

Date brought in for testing: 9th of May, 2024 

This sample has been sent to the laboratory for further testing and these results will be updated. 

Update: 22nd May 2024

Results are back further laboratory testing.

Substances detected from further testing: Ketamine and Levamisole.

Levamisole is a common binder that's usually found in cocaine. It does not have any psychoactive effects (taking it won't give you a high). In rare cases, levamisole can cause blood and skin conditions, especially in large amounts. We recommend avoiding injecting Levamisole as it can cause complications. If you feel unwell, or have lesions appear on your skin (especially cheeks and ears) seek medical help immediately. 

Substance presumed to be: Trenbolone enanthate

Date brought in for testing: Third week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Testosterone enanthate

This sample was consistent with containing testosterone enanthate. It's possible some Tren E might be contained as well, but our equipment did not detect it.

Trenbolone and testosterone are both growth hormones, but have different effects in our bodies. Testosterone is naturally produced and approved for use in humans, and is less potent than trenbolone, which does not naturally occur in humans. Testosterone can cause more fluid retention, although generally may have fewer side-effects than trenbolone. This difference in effects you may expect to feel is important to consider when starting a cycle, and self-monitoring throughout your cycle. 

If you choose to take this substance, we recommend making regular appointments to see a trusted clinician. Taking enough testosterone to feel the expected level of noticeable effects as if it were trenbolone, may lead to overloading on testosterone. Excess testosterone can turn into estrogen in the body, and you may want to take estrogen blockers to manage this. Steroids (particularly trenbolone) can increase your blood pressure, cholesterol (which can lead to heart disease or failure), or cause damage to your kidneys, liver, nerves and connective tissue. In all cases, a trusted medical professional can help to monitor your blood pressure and hormone levels. Drug Checking can't determine dosage contained in a vial, but regular check-ups and early detection can help you to change your dosing / steroid to reduce side effects, and make sure you get the gains you want while staying safer. 

Besides the specific drug contained, steroid solutions can always become contaminated by bacteria and mold in the air. After a steroid solution has been opened or exposed to air, we strongly recommend using a wheel filter to remove germs. If you're getting illicit / counterfeit steroids, they may already be non-sterile when you get them. Using a wheel filter is always recommended when you're not sure how a vial has been prepared. You can get these, clean needles and syringes, and advice to make your draw-up, preparation and shot safest, from your local needle exchange outlet at https://www.nznep.org.nz/outlets

You can find more information online at https://www.nznep.org.nz/resources

Steroids 

Filtering 

Injecting

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Second week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Results inconclusive: M-ALPHA, MDMA - awaiting laboratory result.

Please note: This sample is currently at the laboratory for analysis. We'll update this result when results arrive back. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended to check whether we've heard back, and for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

It's possible this substance may contain an uncommon drug (M-ALPHA), which can be a byproduct of MDMA production. We recommend waiting until the result is available before choosing to take this substance. If you choose to take an unidentified drug, we recommend taking extra care when trying it, in case a potent or large amount of drug is contained. You can reduce some of your risk when taking an unknown substance by finely crushing, mixing, then swallowing only a quarter (or less) of a dose / pill, waiting 45-60 minutes to see how it affects your body, and having a trusted friend who can administer naloxone and / or call 111 for an ambulance immediately if anyone experiences concerning effects. 

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Second week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Results inconclusive: MD-N,NDiMe-valerophenone HCl, Dimethylpentylone - awaiting laboratory result.

Please note: This sample is currently at the laboratory for analysis. We'll update this result when results arrive back. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended to check whether we've heard back, and for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

It's possible this sample contained two risky substances: Dimethylpentylone, and a novel drug (MD-valerophenone). Especially in combination, it is likely this sample could cause highly unexpected or dangerous effects. We recommend waiting until the result is available before choosing to take this substance. If you choose to take an unidentified drug, we recommend taking extra care when trying it, in case a potent or large amount of drug is contained. You can reduce some of your risk when taking an unknown substance by finely crushing, mixing, then swallowing only a quarter (or less) of a dose / pill, waiting 45-60 minutes to see how it affects your body, and having a trusted friend who can administer naloxone and / or call 111 for an ambulance immediately if anyone experiences concerning effects. 

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking MDMA.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Second week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Inconclusive - awaiting laboratory result.  No fentanyl, benzodiazepine or nitazene detected.

Please note: This sample is currently at the laboratory for analysis. We'll update this result when results arrive back. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended to check whether we've heard back, and for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

This sample was not able to be identified at the clinic it was presented to, however our tests indicated there is likely no fentanyl, benzodiazepine or nitazene type drugs contained. Strip tests aren't able to detect to those drugs 100% of times - it's important to consider those drugs (or new chemical analogues of them) are unlikely, but could still be present in a sample that has been checked, and make a plan for what to do if someone experiences an unexpected depressant overdose. 

Just because our equipment didn't identify the drug that may be contained in this sample, does not mean there is no drug contained. If you choose to take an unidentified drug, we recommend taking care when trying it, in case a potent or large amount of drug is contained. You can reduce some of your risk when taking an unknown substance by finely crushing, mixing, then swallowing only a quarter (or less) of a dose / pill, waiting 45-60 minutes to see how it affects your body, and having a trusted friend who can administer naloxone and / or call 111 for an ambulance immediately if anyone experiences concerning effects. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Second week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Inconclusive - pending laboratory results.  No fentanyl, benzodiazepine or nitazene detected.

Please note: This sample is currently at the laboratory for analysis. We'll update this result when results arrive back. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended to check whether we've heard back, and for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

This sample was not able to be identified at the clinic it was presented to, however our tests indicated there is likely no fentanyl, benzodiazepine or nitazene type drugs contained. Strip tests aren't able to detect to those drugs 100% of times - it's important to consider those drugs (or new chemical analogues of them) are unlikely, but could still be present in a sample that has been checked, and make a plan for what to do if someone experiences an unexpected depressant overdose. 

Just because our equipment didn't identify the drug that may be contained in this sample, does not mean there is no drug contained. If you choose to take an unidentified drug, we recommend taking care when trying it, in case a potent or large amount of drug is contained. You can reduce some of your risk when taking an unknown substance by finely crushing, mixing, then swallowing only a quarter (or less) of a dose / pill, waiting 45-60 minutes to see how it affects your body, and having a trusted friend who can administer naloxone and / or call 111 for an ambulance immediately if anyone experiences concerning effects. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: Second week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine

This sample was consistent with the presence of methamphetamine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

We see a lot of methamphetamine samples which are consistent with the presence of methamphetamine only, but which produce weak or unexpected effects, which can feel similar to a sample which has been substituted or adulterated. We couldn’t detect any filler or adulterant in this sample, and we suspect this effect is most likely to be due to differences in precursors and synthesis methods, which produce different amounts of L-meth versus D-meth (the psychoactive isomer). We’re working to improve our technology to tell this difference, and will update this result if the laboratory is able to determine the chemical handedness of this sample.

We wrote an article last year with KnowYourStuffNZ explaining some of these differences – have a read here  and feel free to return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended to check on this result for updates. 

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking methamphetamine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: Second week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine, dimethyl sulfone (MSM)

This sample was consistent with the presence of methamphetamine, with dimethyl sulfone (MSM) added as a filler material. Dimethyl sulfone (MSM) is a relatively inert and harmless filler substance when taken in quantities up to several grams, and is generally regarded as safe for human consumption. We are unable to determine how much drug versus filler is contained in this sample. 

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking methamphetamine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: Second week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine

This sample was consistent with the presence of methamphetamine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking methamphetamine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: 4th May, 2024 

This sample was sent for further testing.

Substances detected in the sample from further testing: Amphetamine, Phenethylamine and traces of Methamphetamine.

Phenethylamine is a compound that is produced naturally in the body. It also has stimulant effects and is sometimes sold as a dietary supplement or weight-loss drug. It is recommended not to mix with other stimulant drugs as this can increase their unpleasant or dangerous effects. It can also cause serotonin syndrome when mixed with serotonergic drugs like MDMA, SSRIs, tramadol and MAOIs. It is not recommended for people with migraines, as it can trigger these in some people.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Amphetamines.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 4th May, 2024 

This sample was sent for further testing.

Substances detected in the sample from further testing: Cyputylone (N-Cyclohexylmethylone)

Cyputylone is a synthetic cathinone (bath salt). Very little is known about it as it is a very new substance. Cathinones are usually far more potent than MDMA. If choosing to take Cyputylone, we recommend taking a very small amount and making sure there are people with you who can get help if needed.

If you're experiencing life-threatening symptoms like difficulty breathing, irregular heartbeat, loss of or severe changes in vision, tremors, seizures, loss of consciousness, signs of heart attack or stroke such as numbness or slurred speech; or you're at risk of harming yourself or others, you or the people around you should act quickly. Call 111.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Synthetic Cathinones.

 

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Third week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Inconclusive - pending laboratory analysis.

Please note: This sample is currently at the laboratory for analysis. We'll update this result when results arrive back. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended to check whether we've heard back, and for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

We are still waiting to hear back from the laboratory on this sample's contents - however we have seen a similar sample recently which matched this one closely. In that previous sample, laboratory analysis found the similar pill to contain both BZP and caffeine. It is possible this pill contents may be different, and we'll update this result as soon as more information is available. 

BZP is a synthetic stimulant drug, producing effects similar to dexamphetamine, and side effects which can include nausea, anxiety, vomiting and heart palpitations. Psychosis, and worsening of existing mental health difficulties can also happen after taking BZP. There is very little information about the toxicity of BZP in humans. In repeated (over the course of a night) and high doses, BZP can cause uncontrolled muscle movements, seizures, and unconsciousness requiring hospital care. We recommend avoiding this substance if you have heart issues, seizure disorder, or a history of psychosis. Mixing BZP with other substances or taking high doses is most likely to produce highly unexpected or unpleasant effects. A typical dose of BZP can range between 50 mg and 100 mg (a tenth of a gram) when taken in known quantities - however it is not possible to measure how much drug was contained in this sample. BZP can take a while to take effect - up to two hours - which is worth considering before choosing to take more.

Caffeine is a legal stimulant drug, which can cause wakefulness and euphoria, but also carries risk of side effects including anxiety. Some people can be allergic to caffeine, and in some combinations with other drugs, caffeine can increase your risk of side effects including brain toxicity. We recommend taking care and having a plan for if something goes wrong when taking caffeine with other drugs. 

We are unable to determine how much of each drug may be in this sample. Combining more than one stimulant is more stressful for your body, and creates greater risk of negative side effects and overdose. If someone chooses to take this substance, we recommend starting with a small dose (e.g. 1/4 of a pill dissolved in water), not taking it by yourself (have a trusted friend(s) who can get help if needed), avoid mixing it with additional drugs (including alcohol), and watching for signs of stimulant overamping: Chest pain or severe heart palpitations, overheating, splitting headache, agitation / delirium, seizure and unconsciousness. If someone experiences concerning symptoms after taking this drug, phone 111 immediately to seek medical support. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

UPDATED RESULTS

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine

Date brought in for testing: Third week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Ketamine.

This substance was consistent with the presence of ketamine using our tools in-clinic and further laboratory testing. No other drugs or filler were detected. Effects of taking a substance can sometimes vary depending on set (mindset – how we are feeling) and setting (our surrounding environment). This can be especially the case with substances that have psychedelic or dissociative effects. Click here for more information on staying safer when taking ketamine.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine

Date brought in for testing: Third week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Inconclusive ketamine analogue - pending laboratory analysis.

Please note: This sample is currently at the laboratory for analysis. We'll update this result when results arrive back. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended to check whether we've heard back, and for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

This substance was not consistent with the presence of ketamine. Analogues (that is, chemicals where small parts of the structure have been altered) of ketamine are dissociative drugs as well, but often have different potencies and effects which can be very unexpected or unpleasant. The equivalent dose for a ketamine analogue will be different from the amount of ketamine you might normally take. The exact analogue of ketamine present in this sample hasn't been confirmed yet, however novel ketamine analogues are increasingly common and associated with harm in Australia and overseas. Generally speaking, people often find ketamine analogues to more intoxicating / stronger, but with effects which plateau earlier (meaning taking more doesn't give you more good effects). Visual disturbances, confusion, and hangover effects the next day can be more pronounced after taking analogues of ketamine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

 

 

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine

Date brought in for testing: Third week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Inconclusive ketamine analogue - pending laboratory analysis.

Please note: This sample is currently at the laboratory for analysis. We'll update this result when results arrive back. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended to check whether we've heard back, and for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

This substance was not consistent with the presence of ketamine. Analogues (that is, chemicals where small parts of the structure have been altered) of ketamine are dissociative drugs as well, but often have different potencies and effects which can be very unexpected or unpleasant. The equivalent dose for a ketamine analogue will be different from the amount of ketamine you might normally take. The exact analogue of ketamine present in this sample hasn't been confirmed yet, however novel ketamine analogues are increasingly common and associated with harm in Australia and overseas. Generally speaking, people often find ketamine analogues to more intoxicating / stronger, but with effects which plateau earlier (meaning taking more doesn't give you more good effects). Visual disturbances, confusion, and hangover effects the next day can be more pronounced after taking analogues of ketamine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine 

Date brought in for testing: 22rd May, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine with no filler.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cocaine. 

Substance presumed to be: Amphetamine

Date brought in for testing: Last week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Caffeine.

This sample was consistent with the presence of caffeine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

Caffeine is a legal stimulant drug, which can cause wakefulness and euphoria, but also carries risk of side effects including anxiety. Some people can be allergic to caffeine, and in some combinations with other drugs, caffeine can increase your risk of side effects including brain toxicity. We recommend taking care and having a plan for if something goes wrong when taking caffeine with other drugs.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: Last week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine. 

This sample was consistent with the presence of methamphetamine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking methamphetamine.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: Last week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine.

This sample was consistent with the presence of methamphetamine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking methamphetamine.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine

Date brought in for testing: Last week of May, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Inconclusive ketamine analogue - pending laboratory analysis.

Please note: This sample is currently at the laboratory for analysis. We'll update this result when results arrive back. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended to check whether we've heard back, and for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

This substance was not consistent with the presence of ketamine. Analogues (that is, chemicals where small parts of the structure have been altered) of ketamine are dissociative drugs as well, but often have different potencies and effects which can be very unexpected or unpleasant. The equivalent dose for a ketamine analogue will be different from the amount of ketamine you might normally take. The exact analogue of ketamine present in this sample hasn't been confirmed yet, however novel ketamine analogues are increasingly common and associated with harm in Australia and overseas. Generally speaking, people often find ketamine analogues to more intoxicating / stronger, but with effects which plateau earlier (meaning taking more doesn't give you more good effects). Visual disturbances, confusion, and hangover effects the next day can be more pronounced after taking analogues of ketamine. 

You can read more about some of these ketamine analogues and their effects here, although interpret with caution as we cannot yet confirm which ketamine analogue is in this sample. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

April 2024

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 19th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Tert-butyl hydroquinone. This is a common food additive and does not have any psychoactive effects (will not get you high).

For general information on how to be safer when using drugs, click here.

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: 19th April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Salvia Divinorum 

For general information on how to be safer when using drugs, click here.

Substance presumed to be: Unknown 

Date brought in for testing: 19th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Cannabis

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cannabis.

Substance presumed to be: Diazepam

Date brought in for testing: First week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: (Preliminary result) N-Desethyletonitazene

Please note: The final result for this sample is still being reviewed by the laboratory, and is subject to change. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended, for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

We did not detect any benzodiazepine in this sample. The only substance identified was desethyletonitazene, a very potent novel opioid drug. Desethyletonitazene may be up to 10 times as potent as fentanyl. Fentanyl test strips will not detect the presence of a nitazene. 

Different nitazenes can have dramatically different potencies, including when injected versus taking orally (can be exponentially more potent taken intravenously). Nitazenes are associated with high degrees of harm in NZ, including hospitalisation and death. Both opioid-naïve and opioid-experienced clients are highly at risk of overdose or death from nitazenes. Volumetric dosing can be particularly challenging with nitazenes due to differences in solubility compared with other opioids, and is not necessarily an easy way to reduce risks when taking nitazenes. 

Opioid overdose is life-threatening and often fatal. If you choose to take this substance, know the signs of overdose: slow/shallow/no breathing, blue lips/fingertips, tiny / unresponsive pupils of the eye. We strongly recommend having naloxone (opioid overdose antidote) on hand – you can obtain a kit from your local Needle Exchange Provider (https://www.nznep.org.nz/outlets). Multiple doses of naloxone may be required to reverse an overdose, and it may wear off before the effect of the opioid dose, leading to recurrence of overdose. It is important to remain with a person who has overdosed after administering Naloxone to ensure they are ok and to provide support if overdose does reoccur. We strongly recommend having multiple naloxone ampoules or doses of Nyxoid (nasal spray) if you intend to take nitazenes, and strongly advise calling 111 for an ambulance in addition to naloxone administration if overdose occurs. 

Overdose and death and dramatically more likely in combination with other depressants: alcohol, opioids, benzodiazepines, dissociatives, G/1,4-BD. Especially, novel benzos with long half-lives (e.g. bromazolam) taken in the last few days are significantly more likely to contribute to overdose from nitazenes. Nitazenes should not be taken alone – a trusted friend who knows the dosage a person has taken, route of administration, other drugs consumed, signs of overdose and naloxone administration should be present to provide first aid and seek medical support if needed. You won’t get in trouble for calling an ambulance – they only want to ensure you are safe and breathing.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 6th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no filler

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: 6th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine with no filler 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Methamphetamine. 

Substance presumed to be: Amphetamine 

Date brought in for testing: 6th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Ephedrine 

Ephedrine is a prescription stimulant used for treating colds. It may produce some stimulant effects. Active doses are a bit lower than that of amphetamine, so taking a smaller dose is recommended. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Ephedrine. 

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine 

Date brought in for testing: 6th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine with Sugar 

Sugar is a common filler in drugs. It may cause discomfort if snorted, so consider doing a nasal rinse afterwards. If you are injecting, it is recommended to filter out the sugar with a wheel filter before using. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cocaine. 

Substance presumed to be: GBL

Date brought in for testing: 6th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: GBL with no other substance detected. 

GBL is stronger and easier to overdose on than GHB. We advise taking care to measure your dose. 

Click here for more information on dosage and how to be safer when using GBL.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 4th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no filler

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: 4th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine with no filler 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Methamphetamine. 

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: 4th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine with no filler 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Methamphetamine. 

Substance presumed to be: GHB

Date brought in for testing: 4th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: NMP (1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone) with traces of 1,4 BD and traces of GBL

NMP is an industrial solvent that does not appear to have psychoactive properties. It is considered a toxic chemical and is likely dangerous to ingest. It is recommended not to take this substance. 

Please contact us via The Level contact page if you have further questions about this sample.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using GHB. 

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: First week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA

This sample was consistent with the presence of MDMA. We are unable to determine the amount of MDMA contained, however it is common for illicit pressed pills to contain multiple "doses" of MDMA in Aotearoa. A single dose of MDMA is typically approximately 80-120 mg (depending on your body), and it's not easy to tell how many doses have been put into one pill. You can sometimes tell by the scored marking on the back, the dose a pill is advertised as containing, or a Drug Checking clinic may be able to see signs that indicate multiple doses may be present. 

When MDMA pills contain multiple doses, it can be challenging to know how much to take, has been taken, or to predict the effects that a pill may cause. High doses of MDMA greatly increase the risk of side effects, and risk of interactions with other drugs or medications you may be taking.

The best way to stay safer when taking pills containing unknown amounts of MDMA is to crush a pill up finely, mix it well to ensure the drug contained is evenly distributed, and to divide the powder into sections (e.g. four or eight equal parts), then consume one of those parts and wait 30-45 minutes to see how it affects your body. If you experience any concerning side effects after taking this substance - especially uncontrolled temperature/shivering, agitation/paranoia, an abnormally fast heartbeat, or splitting headache - phone 111 immediately and seek medical support. 

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking MDMA. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Adulterated Cannabis 

Date brought in for testing: 6th April, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: THC 

No other drugs were found in this sample. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cannabis.

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine

Date brought in for testing: Third week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine

Cocaine was detected in this sample – no other drugs or filler were detected. 

Click here for information on staying safer when taking cocaine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: First week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Traces of ketamine, paracetamol, dimethyl sulfone (MSM)

We did not detect any MDMA in this sample. The psychoactive drug that was found in this sample – ketamine – was present only in traces that could be detected by the laboratory analysis. We are unable to determine how much ketamine may be present in this sample. 

We also detected paracetamol (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, commonly sold as Panadol) and a common filler dimethyl sulfone (abbreviation: MSM). Dimethyl sulfone is a relatively inert and harmless filler substance when taken in quantities up to several grams, and is generally regarded as safe for human consumption. Paracetamol can be harmful when taken in large quantities, and can cause liver damage and death if taken beyond the maximum recommended dosage (for adults: no more than 4 grams in 24 hours). 

If you choose to take this substance, we recommend avoiding combining it with alcohol, as it makes liver damage much more likely to occur. If you realise you’ve taken too much, or you experience a severe allergic reaction, unexpected abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, yellow skin/eyes or extreme confusion or sleepiness, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Click here for information on staying safer when taking ketamine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Novel benzodiazepine

Date brought in for testing: Third week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Benzodiazepine (unspecified)

This sample was unable to be conclusively identified at the drug checking clinic it was brought to, but did produce a positive reaction on a Benzodiazepine Test Strip – indicating the presence of a benzodiazepine drug. Different benzos (and especially novel ones, such as those with “flu” at the beginning of the name) can have very different effective dosages, and effects when taken. We recommend returning to the clinic you attended to submit a sample for further checking – this is a totally anonymous way to send a sample to a laboratory for a more specific identification of the drug contained. 

Broadly speaking, novel benzodiazepines often produce similar effects as better-known benzos, but can cause unexpectedly large side effects - particularly sedation (drowsiness) and amnesia (memory loss). Some of these novel benzos have a long "elimination half-life" or time until the drug clears your body. This means that even when you no longer feel affected by the drug, there may still be enough in your blood to make the effects of other drugs unexpectedly or unpredictably strong, which can cause someone to overdose. Even the next day after taking this drug, it is much easier to overdose from taking other substances: especially opioids, alcohol, ketamine, G/1,4-BD/Waz or additional benzo. 

In liquid form, it can be challenging to know how much of the drug you may have taken. Often the person selling it may have purchased or sold it as a different benzo, or may have mixed a different amount of drug / doses in than would be ideal. If someone chooses to take this substance, we recommend starting with a small amount first (e.g. a quarter of the amount of liquid the vendor has indicated as containing “one dose” for the presumed drug) and waiting an hour to see how it affects you, and having a trusted person nearby who can seek medical help if needed. If someone experiences concerning symptoms (especially slowed breathing / unconsciousness) after taking this drug, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: First week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA, dimethylsulfone (MSM)

Two of our reagent tests indicated the presence of MDMA, however this was likely to be very low in amount - our machines and the laboratory were unable to detect it. We cannot determine just how much MDMA was contained, and it's possible the rest of this sample may contain more MDMA than the portion that was measured. It's always a good idea to finely crush and mix substances before taking them to ensure whatever amount of drug contained is mixed evenly before dosing.  

Dimethyl sulfone is a relatively inert and harmless filler substance when taken in quantities up to several grams, and is generally regarded as safe for human consumption. 

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking MDMA. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Last week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Results inconclusive - awaiting laboratory result

Please note: This substance was unable to be conclusively identified at the clinic - we will update this result once the laboratory has had a look. Laboratory confirmation may take up to 2-4 weeks. You can check in with the Drug Checking clinic you attended to find out when more information is available. 

From our measurements so far: Based on the filler and format, it is most likely this tablet is of pharmaceutical origin. We are not yet able to exclude the presence of a psychoactive drug in this sample, however we did not detect fentanyl, benzodiazepine or nitazene drugs. Benzodiazepine and nitazene test strips are never 100% - we recommend caution around any unidentified tablet, and avoiding taking a substance until you're confident in its contents. 

If someone chooses to take an unidentified tablet: We strongly recommend not taking it by yourself - it's worth having a trusted friend who can call for medical help if needed. Especially for a substance of unknown identity and amount, we would strongly recommend crushing and mixing a tablet to ensure any drug contained is evenly distributed, and taking a small amount (e.g. less than a quarter) and seeing how it affects your body before taking more. If somebody experiences any concerning symptoms after taking an unidentified substance - especially slow/no breathing, blue lips / fingertips, or pinpoint / unresponsive pupils - call 111 and seek medical care immediately. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine

Date brought in for testing: Last week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine - no filler detected. 

This sample was consistent with the presence of cocaine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking cocaine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine

Date brought in for testing: Last week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine - no filler detected. 

This sample was consistent with the presence of cocaine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking cocaine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine

Date brought in for testing: Last week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Ketamine - no filler detected. 

This sample was consistent with the presence of ketamine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking ketamine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: GBL

Date brought in for testing: 30th April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: GBL 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using GBL. 

Substance presumed to be: Unknown 

Date brought in for testing: 19th April, 2024 

No further testing was able to be carried out on this sample. Please contact The Level if you require more information. 

Substance presumed to be: Amanita 

Date brought in for testing: 19th April, 2024 

No further testing was able to be carried out on this sample. Please contact The Level if you require more information. 

Substance presumed to be: Unknown 

Date brought in for testing: 19th April, 2024 

No further testing was able to be carried out on this sample. Please contact The Level if you require more information. 

Substance presumed to be: Unknown 

Date brought in for testing: 19th April, 2024 

No further testing was able to be carried out on this sample. Please contact The Level if you require more information. 

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine

Date brought in for testing: Last week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine - no filler detected. 

This sample was consistent with the presence of cocaine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking cocaine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Last week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA – no filler detected. 

This sample was consistent with the presence of MDMA - no other drugs or filler were detected. MDMA can fail to produce expected effects for many reasons – including other medications you may be taking (antidepressants and other drugs like quetiapine), if MDMA or other stimulants have been taken recently, of if your body hasn’t slept or eaten. It’s recommended to leave at least a month (ideally several) between occasions of taking MDMA to maximise the effect you experience from a dose. 

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking MDMA. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine

Date brought in for testing: Last week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine - no filler detected. 

This sample was consistent with the presence of cocaine - no other drugs or filler were detected.

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking cocaine. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be:

Date brought in for testing: Last week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA - no filler detected. 

This sample was consistent with the presence of MDMA - no other drugs or filler were detected.

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking MDMA. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Last week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: (Preliminary result) Zopiclone

Please note: The final result for this sample is still being reviewed by the laboratory, and is subject to change. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended, for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

This sample was consistent with the presence of Zopiclone - no other drugs or filler were detected. We are unable to determine the amount of drug contained in the sample or its purity. 

Zopiclone is a pharmaceutical drug which can produce some similar effects as benzodiazepine drugs: particularly drowsiness, and helping you to stay asleep. Zopiclone is not a benzodiazepine drug, and so will not show a positive reaction on a benzo test strip - however the effects and risks can be similar. In high doses, or taken regularly or not around sleeping, zopiclone can make it difficult to form and recall memories (amnesia), as well as affecting good decision-making. Overdose on zopiclone can look like difficulty / uncoordinated moving, low blood pressure, or someone may stop breathing and die. Overdose is much more likely if this drug is combined with other depressants: High or repeated doses of this substance, or combination with other benzodiazepine, opioid, dissociative, fantasy-type (G/1,4-BD) drugs or alcohol greatly increases risks of vomiting, stopping breathing, or death. 

If someone chooses to take this substance, we recommend starting with a lower dose than may be indicated (e.g. a half or quarter of a tablet), allowing 30-45 minutes for the drug to take effect, and seeing how your body feels before taking more. There is no overdose reversal agent available for first-aid in case of benzo / Z-drug overdose (naloxone will not work for this drug class) - medical care is required to ensure someone stays safe and breathing after an overdose. If you or anybody experiences slow / shallow / no breathing, or blue fingertips or lips after taking this substance, make sure someone phones 111 immediately to seek medical support.. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: First week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Traces of ketamine, dimethyl sulfone (MSM), paracetamol

Please note: The result for this sample is a combination of in-clinic and laboratory checking results. Not all substances were detected by the laboratory, and are presented here as not conclusive, but likely enough to consider building into your risk reduction planning. Both reagents and the spectrometer we use gave good indication of the presence of paracetamol in addition to the drugs the laboratory found (trace ketamine and MSM). Drop back in to the Drug Checking clinic you attended, or get in touch with the team via email or phone for more information and advice around this specific result. 

This substance was consistent with the presence of trace amounts of ketamine, and two fillers: dimethylsulfone (MSM) and paracetamol. We are unable to determine the amount of drug contained in the sample or its purity. Dimethyl sulfone (MSM) is a relatively inert and harmless filler substance when taken in quantities up to several grams, and is generally regarded as safe for human consumption. Paracetamol can be harmful when taken in large quantities, and can cause liver damage and death if taken beyond the maximum recommended dosage (for adults: no more than 4 grams in 24 hours). 

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking ketamine.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA, ketamine

Date brought in for testing: Third week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA, starch-like filler.

This sample was consistent with the presence of MDMA - no other drugs were detected.

It's always possible that the bit of sample measured happened to be missing a drug that was present in the rest of the sample. When a sample is advertised as containing multiple drugs, it's wise to assume it could still be present in another part of the sample. Ketamine is a dissociative anaesthetic that worsens your coordination, which you may be less aware of while under the influence of MDMA. Large doses of ketamine and MDMA together may create risk of Serotonin Syndrome, which can be fatal - especially if somebody is taking MAOI type anti-depressants.  We are unable to determine how much of each drug may be in this sample. 

We can never guarantee the contents of a sample, or that a drug is safe to take. If someone plans to take this substance, we recommend researching dosage, risks associated with the drug/s identified, and the effects you expect to feel. It's always a good idea to have a plan in place to ensure you and others can stay safe if you feel unexpected effects. Avoiding taking drugs alone, making sure your body is well rested, fed and hydrated, and avoiding mixing substances are all great ways to reduce your risk when taking any drug. 

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking MDMA and ketamine.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Mixed psychoactives

Date brought in for testing: Last week of April, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: (Preliminary result) Ketamine, Nimetazepam, Caffeine, traces of methamphetamine

Please note: The final result for this sample is still being reviewed by the laboratory, and is subject to change. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended, for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

This substance was unable to be identified at the Drug Checking clinic - however laboratory analysis indicates 3 (plus a bit) psychoactive drugs may be present. We are unable to determine how much of each drug may be present, and recommend strong caution if you choose to take this substance. 

Ketamine is a dissociative anaesthetic commonly used both in medicine and recreation, which can cause effects including hallucinations, worsened coordination, and altered perception of reality. At higher doses, a phenomenon termed the ""K hole"" may be experienced, which can be alarming or hazardous if you aren't highly experienced and expecting it. It's essential to know how much of this drug you may have taken to stay safer when taking it, especially as ketamine's effects can be more strongly pronounced when taken in combination with other substances. 

Nimetazepam is a benzodiazepine drug, which can cause effects including sedation, reduction of anxiety, and at higher doses, there is a high risk of amnesia, very strange decision-making, and unconsciousness or death. Taken regularly, benzodiazepines can be highly addictive and dependence-causing. Stopping taking benzodiazepines suddenly can be dangerous once dependence develops - if you're concerned about stopping taking benzos, reach out to a trusted medical professional to find a safe way to stop taking these drugs. 

Caffeine is a legal stimulant drug, which can cause wakefulness and euphoria, but also carries risk of side effects including anxiety. In some combinations with other drugs, caffeine can increase your risk of side effects including brain toxicity. We recommend taking care and having a plan for if something goes wrong when taking caffeine with other drugs. 

Methamphetamine was also detected, although likely in small amounts. We are unable to determine the amount of any of the drugs contained in the sample, or their purity. 

The combination of these substances, and their unknown dosage, may produce dramatically unexpected effects and risk of overdose. In particular, the combination of ketamine and nimetazepam is likely to create risk of unconsciousness or stopping breathing. We strongly recommend avoiding taking this substance in high doses or in combination with other drugs. If you choose to take this substance, start with a very low dose (10 milligrams or less) and wait at least an hour to see how it affects you, and have a trusted friend with you who can get medical help if needed. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

March 2024

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for checking: Second week of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Traces of Loperamide – no benzodiazepine detected.

When this substance was presented for checking, we were unable to determine the active drug it contained, due to the large amount of filler material (consistent with some pharmaceutical pills). A benzodiazepine strip test at the time indicated this sample may have contained a benzodiazepine drug – however, this finding was not confirmed by the laboratory. Forensic analysis identified only loperamide in this sample.

Loperamide is an anti-diarrheal drug, which works on opioid receptors in the gut to slow muscle contraction and relieve symptoms. We are not able to determine the amount of loperamide contained in this sample.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: Thursday 28th of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample:  Isopropylbenzylamine (n-iso) only – no methamphetamine was detected.

This sample was found to only contain n-iso (isopropylbenzylamine), a substitute for methamphetamine. N-iso produces no positive psychoactive effects, and can instead cause heavy, sluggish, unwell feelings when it is taken and over time.

You can use reagents at home to check if any methamphetamine is present in a sample – a Marquis reagent test (EZTest Ecstasy test from Cosmic) will turn orange/brown if any amphetamine is in a sample. Simon’s reagent test can then be used to clarify if a result indicates methamphetamine (blue reaction) or amphetamine (no reaction to Simon’s). A positive reagent reaction can still mean other substances are present – we recommend checking on an FTIR spectrometer at our clinic to identify if multiple substances may be in your sample.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: Thursday 28th of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample:  Isopropylbenzylamine (n-iso) only – no methamphetamine was detected.

This sample was found to only contain n-iso (isopropylbenzylamine), a substitute for methamphetamine. N-iso produces no positive psychoactive effects, and can instead cause heavy, sluggish, unwell feelings when it is taken and over time.

You can use reagents at home to check if any methamphetamine is present in a sample – a Marquis reagent test (EZTest Ecstasy test from Cosmic) will turn orange/brown if any amphetamine is in a sample. Simon’s reagent test can then be used to clarify if a result indicates methamphetamine (blue reaction) or amphetamine (no reaction to Simon’s). A positive reagent reaction can still mean other substances are present – we recommend checking on an FTIR spectrometer at our clinic to identify if multiple substances may be in your sample.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: Thursday 28th of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample:  Isopropylbenzylamine (n-iso) only – no methamphetamine was detected.

This sample was found to only contain n-iso (isopropylbenzylamine), a substitute for methamphetamine. N-iso produces no positive psychoactive effects, and can instead cause heavy, sluggish, unwell feelings when it is taken and over time.

You can use reagents at home to check if any methamphetamine is present in a sample – a Marquis reagent test (EZTest Ecstasy test from Cosmic) will turn orange/brown if any amphetamine is in a sample. Simon’s reagent test can then be used to clarify if a result indicates methamphetamine (blue reaction) or amphetamine (no reaction to Simon’s). A positive reagent reaction can still mean other substances are present – we recommend checking on an FTIR spectrometer at our clinic to identify if multiple substances may be in your sample.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Last week of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Diclofenac

This sample was found to contain diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug often used to treat pain (frequently marketed as “Voltaren”). We are unable to determine how much diclofenac was contained in this sample. It is possible and likely that other supplements or fillers may be present in this sample - however diclofenac was the only major active ingredient we were able to detect.

Diclofenac can cause stomach and kidney damage or failure when taken over longer periods of time, or in large doses (>150 mg per day), or in combination with other NSAID drugs. If someone chooses to take this substance, it's worth checking in with a trusted medical professional to ensure it doesn't interact with any other medication you're taking, and that you aren't at risk of unexpected side-effects.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: First week of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample:  Traces of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

This sample was found to contain traces of THC, the main psychoactive drug present in cannabis flower products. We're unable to determine how much THC was contained. Cannabis can produce a range of side-effects for different people, including hyperemesis (vomiting).

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Second week of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample:  Traces of bromazolam

This sample was found to contain bromazolam - a novel benzodiazepine drug. This substance produces some similar effects as better-known benzos, but can cause unexpectedly large side effects - particularly drowsiness and memory loss. In humans, bromazolam has a large "elimination half-life", meaning that even when you no longer feel affected by the drug, there is still enough in your blood to make the effects of other drugs unexpectedly or unpredictably strong, which can cause someone to overdose. Even the next day after taking this drug, it is much easier to overdose from taking other substances: especially opioids, alcohol, ketamine, G/BD/Waz or additional benzo.

In pressed pills, it is difficult to know how much you bromazlam you may have taken - often the person selling it may have purchased or sold it as a different benzo, and put a different amount of drug / doses in than would be ideal. If someone chooses to take this substance, we recommend starting with a small amount first (e.g. a quarter of a dose) and waiting 30-45 minutes to see how it affects you, and having a trusted person nearby who can seek medical help if needed. If someone experiences concerning symptoms (especially slowed breathing / unconsciousness) after taking this drug, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Second week of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Bromazolam

This sample was found to contain bromazolam - a novel benzodiazepine drug. This substance produces some similar effects as better-known benzos, but can cause unexpectedly large side effects - particularly drowsiness and memory loss. In humans, bromazolam has a large "elimination half-life", meaning that even when you no longer feel affected by the drug, there is still enough in your blood to make the effects of other drugs unexpectedly or unpredictably strong, which can cause someone to overdose. Even the next day after taking this drug, it is much easier to overdose from taking other substances: especially opioids, alcohol, ketamine, G/BD/Waz or additional benzo.

In pressed pills, it is difficult to know how much you bromazlam you may have taken - often the person selling it may have purchased or sold it as a different benzo, and put a different amount of drug / doses in than would be ideal. If someone chooses to take this substance, we recommend starting with a small amount first (e.g. a quarter of a dose) and waiting 30-45 minutes to see how it affects you, and having a trusted person nearby who can seek medical help if needed. If someone experiences concerning symptoms (especially slowed breathing / unconsciousness) after taking this drug, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA in pressed pill

Date brought in for testing: 27th March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with cellulose as filler. We estimate that this pill contains roughly 1.5 doses of MDMA. Because of this we recommend taking less than the entire pill.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 22nd March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no filler

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 22nd March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no filler

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine

Date brought in for testing: 21st March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine with no filler.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cocaine.

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine 

Date brought in for testing: 21st March 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Ketamine with no filler 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Ketamine. 

Substance presumed to be: MDMA in a pressed pill

Date brought in for testing: 16th March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA and Cellulose (a common and non-psychoactive filler)

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: Second week of March

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA, dimethylsulfone (MSM)

Dimethyl sulfone (MSM) is a common, relatively inert and harmless filler substance when taken in quantities up to several grams, and is generally regarded as safe for human consumption. If you’re thinking of snorting it, take your time crushing it to avoid hurting your nose with the sharp crystals.

We are unable to determine how much MDMA versus MSM was present in this sample. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend treating it as if it were full potency – try the intended dose you may take normally, give it 30-45 minutes to take effect, and see how it affects you before deciding whether you would want to take more.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine

Date brought in for testing: Second week of March

Substances detected in the sample: Ketamine, with no binder or filler detected.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Ketamine.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Second week of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), oil

Two substances were detected in this sample, oil and tetrahydrocannabinol, consistent with a Cannabis extract. We are unable to determine the amount of substance contained, or potency. If someone chooses to take this substance, they can safer by starting with a lower dose, and avoiding mixing it with other substances.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA 

Date brought in for testing: 8th March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA and creatine 

Creatine is a common non-psychoactive filler. It is not dangerous to take, but can cause discomfort if snorted, so a nasal rinse is recommended if you do choose to snort. You can see how to do a nasal rinse here. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 8th March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no binder or filler detected 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA. 

To learn more about drug checking in New Zealand, visit our information page on The Level

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 8th March, 2024  

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no binder or filler detected 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA. 

To learn more about drug checking in New Zealand, visit our information page on The Level

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 8th March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no binder or filler detected 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA. 

To learn more about drug checking in New Zealand, visit our information page on The Level

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine 

Date brought in for testing: 7th March 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Ketamine with no binder or filler 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Ketamine. 

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine

Date brought in for testing: 7th March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine with creatine as filler. Creatine is a common and non-toxic filler.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cocaine.

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine

Date brought in for testing: 7th March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine with no filler

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cocaine.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA in a pressed pill

Date brought in for testing: 2nd March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Cellulose, parexyl and phosphate calcium dibasic (all three substances are binder and filler and do not have psychoactive effects). Very trace amounts of MDMA were detected.

Phosphate Calcium Dibasic can be dangerous to consume in larger quantities.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA. 

Contact drugchecking@drugfoundation.org.nz if you have any questions about your results.

Substance presumed to be: Cocaine

Date brought in for testing: 2nd March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine with non-psychoactive plant matter as a small amount filler.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cocaine.

Contact drugchecking@drugfoundation.org.nz if you have any questions about your results.

Substance presumed to be: Nitazene

Date brought in for testing: Third week of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample:  Preliminary result: Protonitazepyne (pyrrolidinyl-protonitazene) or Isotonitazepyne (pyrrolidinyl-isotonitazene)

Please note: The final result for this sample is still being reviewed by the laboratory, and is subject to change. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended, for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

We are not able to verify precisely which nitazene opioid this sample contained, however, it was consistent with a pyro-type nitazene (nitazepyne).  Different nitazenes can have dramatically different potencies, including when injected versus taking orally (can be exponentially more potent taken intravenously). Protonitazene and isotonitazene are more potent than (e.g.) metonitazene, and are more strongly associated with overdose and death.  Nitazepyne (pyrrolidinyl) nitazenes especially can be dramatically more potent than their regular counterparts. Nitazenes are associated with high degrees of harm in NZ, including hospitalisation and death. Both opioid-naïve and opioid-experienced clients are highly at risk of overdose or death from nitazenes. Volumetric dosing can be particularly challenging with nitazenes due to differences in solubility compared with other opioids, and is not necessarily an easy way to reduce risks when taking nitazenes. 

Opioid overdose is life-threatening and often fatal. If you choose to take this substance, know the signs of overdose: slow/shallow/no breathing, blue lips/fingertips, tiny / unresponsive pupils of the eye. We strongly recommend having naloxone (opioid overdose antidote) on hand – you can obtain a kit from your local Needle Exchange Provider (https://www.nznep.org.nz/outlets). Multiple doses of naloxone may be required to reverse an overdose, and it may wear off before the effect of the opioid dose, leading to recurrence of overdose. It is important to remain with a person who has overdosed after administering Naloxone to ensure they are ok and to provide support if overdose does reoccur. We strongly recommend having multiple naloxone ampoules or doses of Nyxoid (nasal spray) if you intend to take nitazenes, and strongly advise calling 111 for an ambulance in addition to naloxone administration if overdose occurs.

Overdose and death and dramatically more likely in combination with other depressants: alcohol, opioids, benzodiazepines, dissociatives, G/1,4-BD. Especially, novel benzos with long half-lives (e.g. bromazolam) taken in the last few days are significantly more likely to contribute to overdose from nitazenes. Nitazenes should not be taken alone – a trusted friend who knows the dosage a person has taken, route of administration, other drugs consumed, signs of overdose and naloxone administration should be present to provide first aid and seek medical support if needed. You won’t get in trouble for calling an ambulance – they only want to ensure you are safe and breathing.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: Second week of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample:  MDMA, with no filler or adulterant detected

When this substance was measured in clinic, it was suspected to contain a cathinone (n-butylpentylone) in addition to MDMA. Further laboratory checking has found this substance to be consistent with MDMA only.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 21st March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Eutylone 

This sample contained no MDMA. Eutylone is a synthetic cathinone, it is stronger than MDMA and can have more unpleasant and unpredictable effects. If you choose to take it, it is recommended to dose lower than MDMA.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Synthetic Cathinones.

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine 

Date brought in for testing: 8th of March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: n-isopropylbenzylamine and n-methyl-cyclohexanamine

N-isopropylbenzylamine (N-iso) can cause a burning sensation or soreness if injected, as well as nausea and digestive issues and more (more info here: https://thelevel.org.nz/news-and-stories/what-is-n-iso).

n-Methyl-cyclohexanamine is an industrial chemical with no psychoactive properties and not for human  consumption.

Because of this, we recommend not taking the sample. If you'd like to talk through your results, call 04 801 6303.

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 27th March, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with traces of cocaine

Mixing MDMA and Cocaine is riskier than taking either of these substances alone, and may put extra strain on your body. It is recommended that you take a lower dose and wait to see how you feel before using more. Remember that the chocolate chip cookie effect means that different parts of the bag will have different amounts of MDMA and cocaine, so it is recommended to crush, mix and measure your dose before taking. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cocaine. 

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Third week of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: (Preliminary result) Ketamine, Nimetazepam, Caffeine

Please note: The final result for this sample is still being reviewed by the laboratory, and is subject to change. If this was your sample, you can return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended, for additional advice to keep you and your community safer. 

This substance was unable to be identified at the Drug Checking clinic - however laboratory analysis indicates 3 psychoactive drugs may be present. We are unable to determine how much of each drug may be present, and recommend strong caution if you choose to take this substance. 

Ketamine is a dissociative anaesthetic commonly used both in medicine and recreation, which can cause effects including hallucinations, worsened coordination, and altered perception of reality. At higher doses, a phenomenon termed the "K hole" may be experienced, which can be alarming or hazardous if you aren't highly experienced and expecting it. It's essential to know how much of this drug you may have taken to stay safer when taking it, especially as ketamine's effects can be more strongly pronounced when taken in combination with other substances. 

Nimetazepam is a benzodiazepine drug, which can cause effects including sedation, reduction of anxiety, and at higher doses, there is a high risk of amnesia, very strange decision-making, and unconsciousness or death. Taken regularly, benzodiazepines can be highly addictive and dependence-causing. Stopping taking benzodiazepines suddenly can be dangerous once dependence develops - if you're concerned about stopping taking benzos, reach out to a trusted medical professional to find a safe way to stop taking these drugs. 

Caffeine is a legal stimulant drug, which cause cause wakefulness and euphoria, but also carries risk of side effects including anxiety. In some combinations with other drugs, caffeine can increase your risk of side effects including brain toxicity. We recommend taking care and having a plan for if something goes wrong when taking caffeine with other drugs. 

The combination of these substances, and their unknown dosage, may produce dramatically unexpected effects and risk of overdose. In particular, the combination of ketamine and nimetazepam is likely to create risk of unconsciousness or stopping breathing. We strongly recommend avoiding taking this substance in high doses or in combination with other drugs. If you choose to take this substance, start with a very low dose (10 milligrams or less) and wait at least an hour to see how it affects you, and have a trusted friend with you who can get medical help if needed. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: Third week of March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: N-butylpentylone, dimethylsulfone (MSM), traces of isopropylbenzylamine

This substance contained a high-risk cathinone (also known as bath salts), n-butylpentylone. Dimethyl sulfone (MSM) is a relatively inert and harmless filler substance when taken in quantities up to several grams, and is generally regarded as safe for human consumption. Isopropylbenzylamine (n-iso / IPBA) is a somewhat common additive to stimulants, which cause effects of feeling slightly unwell, especially when taken regularly.  It is common to see this sample format containing MDMA, and we recommend assuming there is an undetermined amount of MDMA present in this sample as well. 

n-butylpentylone is relatively new to Aotearoa, but is highly related to a high-risk cathinone (n-ethylpentylone), which has caused over a dozen hospitalisations in recent years. N-butylpentylone is associated with recent harm in Aotearoa, and anecdotal reports from University Orientation week indicate this substance was not enjoyable for the people who consumed it, leaving some “feeling like death” with severe side effects.

Reagent testing: The high-risk cathinone in this sample is often combined with MDMA, which means at-home reagent tests may produce a false-positive reaction for MDMA which hides the presence of a cathinone. If you use a reagent test to identify the presence of this substance, consider that a (e.g. using Cosmic EZTest Ecstasy) yellow colour change (cathinone-like) indicates a risk, while a black (MDMA-like) reaction does not reliably mean there is no cathinone contained. Getting your drugs checked on a FTIR spectrometer is necessary to exclude the absence of a cathinone.

If you choose to take this substance: n-butylpentylone may produce similar desirable effects as other stimulants, but these are likely to peak and run out much sooner than better-known drugs. The side effects of this drug are likely to be much more intense than for MDMA (which it may be sold / represented as), and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, intense anxiety and agitation, overheating, seizure and in severe cases, death. These cathinone drugs create a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and experience an ‘over-amping’ type overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. starting with 1/10th of the amount you might take of MDMA), and to avoid taking it without a trusted person present or combining it with other substances.

For samples containing both MDMA and cathinone: Combining more than one stimulant is more stressful for your body, and creates greater risk of negative side effects and overdose. If you experience any concerning symptoms, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

More information on this class of substances can be found at https://www.highalert.org.nz/articles/synthetic-cathinones-explained/

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing:  27/03/2024

Substances detected in the sample: N-Isopropyl Butylone (Isoputylone) or N-propyl Butylone (Putylone)*

*It was not possible to determine which of the two putylone-type substances was detected as ESR does not currently have a reference material for comparison.

The only substance detected in this sample was a modified cathinone, propyl-butylone. Synthetic cathinones (also known as bath salts) can be riskier and more difficult to take safely than MDMA. Not much is known about this novel drug yet, but it is highly likely that it may produce some similar desirable effects as other stimulants, which peak and run out much sooner than the presumed drug. The side effects of these drugs are usually more intense than for MDMA, and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, and intense anxiety and agitation. These drugs create a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. 1/5th of the amount you might take of MDMA), not using alone, or combining it with other substances. If someone experiences concerning symptoms (especially slowed breathing/unconsciousness) after taking this drug, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 23/3/2024

Substances detected in the sample: Cyputylone +traces of MDMA

The main substance detected in this sample was Cyputylone - a moderately risky synthetic cathinone (also known as bath salts). Cyputylone may produce similar desirable effects as other stimulants, but can peak and run out much sooner than the presumed drug. The side effects of this drug are usually more intense than for MDMA, and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, and intense anxiety and agitation. This drug creates a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. 1/6th of the amount you might take of MDMA), not using alone, or combining it with other substances.

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date Brought in for testing:  19/03/2024

Substances detected in the sample: Mixture: MDMA +N-Butyl Pentylone or N-Isobutyl Pentylone* + Caffeine

*It was not possible to determine which of the two putylone-type substances was detected as ESR does not currently have a reference material for comparison.

One of the substances detected in this sample was a modified cathinone, propyl-butylone. Synthetic cathinones (also known as bath salts) can be riskier and more difficult to take safely than MDMA. Not much is known about this novel drug yet, but it is highly likely that it may produce some similar desirable effects as other stimulants, which peak and run out much sooner than the presumed drug. The side effects of these drugs are usually more intense than for MDMA, and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, and intense anxiety and agitation. These drugs create a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. 1/5th of the amount you might take of MDMA), not using alone, or combining it with other substances. If someone experiences concerning symptoms (especially slowed breathing/unconsciousness) after taking this drug, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

As this sample is mixed with two other stimulants (MDMA + Caffeine) it is recommended extreme caution is taken.

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

February 2024

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: Last week of February, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Isoputylone or Putylone ([iso]propylbutylone)

The only substance detected in this sample was a modified cathinone, propyl-butylone. Synthetic cathinones (also known as bath salts) can be riskier and more difficult to take safely than MDMA. Not much is known about this novel drug yet, but it is highly likely that it may produce some similar desirable effects as other stimulants, which peak and run out much sooner than the presumed drug. The side effects of these drugs are usually more intense than for MDMA, and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, and intense anxiety and agitation. These drugs create a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. 1/5th of the amount you might take of MDMA), not using alone, or combining it with other substances. If someone experiences concerning symptoms (especially slowed breathing / unconsciousness) after taking this drug, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: Last week of February, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Isoputylone or Putylone ([iso]propylbutylone)

The only substance detected in this sample was a modified cathinone, propyl-butylone. Synthetic cathinones (also known as bath salts) can be riskier and more difficult to take safely than MDMA. Not much is known about this novel drug yet, but it is highly likely that it may produce some similar desirable effects as other stimulants, which peak and run out much sooner than the presumed drug. The side effects of these drugs are usually more intense than for MDMA, and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, and intense anxiety and agitation. These drugs create a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. 1/5th of the amount you might take of MDMA), not using alone, or combining it with other substances. If someone experiences concerning symptoms (especially slowed breathing / unconsciousness) after taking this drug, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Last week of February

Substances detected in the sample: Benzylpiperazine (BZP), caffeine, other drugs not conclusively identified (pending final result).

Please note: The final result for this sample is still being reviewed by the laboratory, and is subject to change. We are posting this preliminary result with a request for more information. If this was your sample, please return to the Drug Checking clinic you attended for follow-up advice to keep you and your community safer.

Forensic checking indicates this sample is likely to contain two stimulants: a psychoactive drug, benzylpiperazine (BZP), and caffeine. It is possible other psychoactive substances were also present - pending review. BZP produces stimulant effects, and was legally sold in Aotearoa in “party pills” before becoming illegal for sale in 2008. A dose range for this substance can be between 50 mg and 100 mg (a tenth of a gram) when taken in known quantities . However, we are unable to determine how much substance this sample (or others like it) may contain, or the amount of caffeine that may also be present in this sample.

It is likely this sample contained more than one psychoactive, which can carry much greater risk of unexpected and harmful effects. If someone chooses to take this substance, they should not be alone after taking it. If someone experiences any concerning symptoms after taking this substance, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine 

Date brought in for testing: 16th February, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Ketamine with no binder or filler 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Ketamine. 

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 16th February, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA with no binder or filler 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA. 

Substance presumed to be: Pseudoephedrine and Coffee 

Date brought in for testing: 29th February, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Sugar-type substance and a small amount of ephedrine

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Prescription Stimulants. 

Substance presumed to be: Pseudoephedrine 

Date brought in for testing: 29th February, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Pseudoephedrine 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Prescription Stimulants. 

Substance presumed to be: Methamphetamine

Date brought in for testing: 29th February, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Methamphetamine

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Methamphetamine. 

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Second week of February, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: (Preliminary result) Propyl (or Isopropyl)-butylone

The drug: This sample is awaiting final result, but the preliminary laboratory look indicates this substance is either of two very new, potentially high-risk cathinones (also known as bath salts).  We haven’t seen these specific substances in Aotearoa before, and don’t yet know how harmful they may be. Importantly, the modified [iso]propyl version of this drug may produce very different effects than if it was just butylone.

Reagent testing: We have seen recent instances of these cathinones combined with small amounts of MDMA, which means at-home reagent tests may produce a false-positive reaction for MDMA which hides the presence of a cathinone. If you use a reagent test to identify the presence of this substance, consider that a (e.g. using Cosmic EZTest Ecstasy) yellow colour change (cathinone-like) indicates a risk, while a black (MDMA-like) reaction does not reliably mean there is no cathinone contained. Getting your drugs checked on a FTIR spectrometer is necessary to exclude the absence of a cathinone.

If you choose to take this substance: [Iso]propylbutylone may produce similar desirable effects as other stimulants, but these are likely to peak and run out much sooner than better-known drugs. The side effects of this drug are likely to be much more intense than for MDMA (which it may be sold / represented as), and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, intense anxiety and agitation, overheating, seizure and in severe cases, death. These cathinone drugs create a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and experience an ‘over-amping’ type overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. starting with 1/10th of the amount you might take of MDMA), and to avoid taking it without a trusted person present or combining it with other substances. If you experience any concerning symptoms, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing:  Second week of February, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Paracetamol, Dimethyl sulfone (MSM)

This substance was represented as MDMA, however both our clinic and the laboratory were only able to find Paracetamol (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, commonly sold as Panadol) and a common filler, dimethyl sulfone (abbreviation: MSM). Dimethyl sulfone (MSM) is a relatively inert and harmless filler substance when taken in quantities up to several grams, and is generally regarded as safe for human consumption.

Paracetamol can be harmful when taken in large quantities, and can cause liver damage and death if taken beyond the maximum recommended dosage (for adults: no more than 4 grams in 24 hours). If you choose to take this substance, avoid combining it with alcohol, as it makes liver damage much more likely to occur. If you realise you’ve taken too much, or you experience a severe allergic reaction, unexpected abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, yellow skin/eyes or extreme confusion or sleepiness, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Substance presumed to be: Synthetic cannabinoid

Date brought in for testing: Second week of February, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMB-4en-PINACA

This substance contained a high-risk synthetic cannabinoid, MDMB-4en-PINACA. This substance is highly associated with symptoms including psychosis, extreme agitation, upset body temperature, and other severe side effects. This substance has been responsible for a majority of synthetic cannabinoid deaths in previous years.

If you choose to take this substance, we recommend having starting with a lower dose, having trusted folks around who can make sure you're well and safe, and limiting the maximum dose you might take. If you experience any concerning symptoms, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.  

More information on this substance can be found at https://www.highalert.org.nz/alerts-and-notifications/serious-synthetic-cannabinoids-harm-in-christchurch/

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: Second week of February, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: n-butylpentylone, MDMA, dimethyl sulfone (MSM)

This substance contained both MDMA and a high-risk cathinone (also known as bath salts), n-butylpentylone. Dimethyl sulfone (MSM) is a relatively inert and harmless filler substance when taken in quantities up to several grams, and is generally regarded as safe for human consumption.

The drug: n-butylpentylone is relatively new to Aotearoa, but is highly related to a high-risk cathinone (n-ethylpentylone), which has caused over a dozen hospitalisations in recent years. N-butylpentylone is associated with recent harm in Aotearoa, and anecdotal reports from University Orientation week indicate this substance was not enjoyable for the people who consumed it, leaving some “feeling like death” with severe side effects.

Reagent testing: The high-risk cathinone in this sample is combined with MDMA, which means at-home reagent tests may produce a false-positive reaction for MDMA which hides the presence of a cathinone. If you use a reagent test to identify the presence of this substance, consider that a (e.g. using Cosmic EZTest Ecstasy) yellow colour change (cathinone-like) indicates a risk, while a black (MDMA-like) reaction does not reliably mean there is no cathinone contained. Getting your drugs checked on a FTIR spectrometer is necessary to exclude the absence of a cathinone.

If you choose to take this substance: n-butylpentylone may produce similar desirable effects as other stimulants, but these are likely to peak and run out much sooner than better-known drugs. The side effects of this drug are likely to be much more intense than for MDMA (which it may be sold / represented as), and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, intense anxiety and agitation, overheating, seizure and in severe cases, death. These cathinone drugs create a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and experience an ‘over-amping’ type overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. starting with 1/10th of the amount you might take of MDMA), and to avoid taking it without a trusted person present or combining it with other substances.

This sample contained both MDMA and cathinone: Combining more than one stimulant is more stressful for your body, and creates greater risk of negative side effects and overdose. If you experience any concerning symptoms, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

More information on this class of substances can be found at https://www.highalert.org.nz/articles/synthetic-cathinones-explained/

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Adulterated ketamine

Date brought in for testing: Last week of February, 2024

Substances detected in the sample:  Ketamine – no fillers or analogues detected

This substance was confirmed by laboratory analysis as consistent with ketamine – no filler or analogues were detected. We are unable to determine the proportion of R-/S-ketamine in this sample, or whether isomers of the chemical may contribute to unexpected effects from this sample. It’s plausible for ketamine to produce a wide variety of effects at different doses, depending on how your body is feeling that day, or in combination with other substances.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Ketamine.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Unknown

Date brought in for testing: Third week of February, 2024

Substances detected in the sample:  Methyl-cyclohexanamine

Cyclohexanamines are a group of substances that produce poor (or no) psychoactive effects, but do have a high risk of causing injury.

We strongly recommend not taking this substance by any route of administration (especially injecting) – expected effects include burning at the site of administration. If someone does choose to take this substance and experiences any concerning symptoms, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Ketamine

Date brought in for testing: Third week of February, 2024

Substances detected in the sample:  Ketamine, traces of MDMA, traces of amphetamine

This substance was found by laboratory analysis to contain traces of additional stimulant drugs. Although only traces were detected in the small sample measured, it’s possible larger quantities of the drugs may have been present in the product that was purchased. In combination, multiple substances can commonly cause unexpected effects. If someone chooses to take this substance, we recommend starting with a lower dose than you would usually take, and having trusted people around who can seek help if something goes wrong. If someone experiences any concerning symptoms, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Ketamine.

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

Substance presumed to be: Ephedrine

Date brought in for testing: 1st March, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: Levamisole

There was no ephedrine found in this sample. Levamisole is a veterinary drug that is sometimes used to cut drugs like cocaine. In can cause rare, but serious side effects if taken, especially in larger doses- including dizziness, abdominal pain, vomiting and serious skin rashes. It can also affect the white blood cells. If you choose to take this substance, it is recommended to use a small dose, and avoid redosing. 

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 24th February, 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: N-Isopropyl Butylone (Isoputylone) or N-Propyl Butylone (Putylone). 

Both of these substances are Synthetic Cathinones (bath salts) and are much more potent than MDMA. If you choose to take this sample, start with very low doses and avoid re-dosing.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Synthetic Cathinones.

Updated 

Substance presumed to be: Flubromazolam

Date brought in for testing: 15th April. 2024 

Substances detected in the sample: Flubromazolam 

This sample was sent to the laboratory and only flubromazolam was detected. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using benzos. 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 19/2/2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

Contact Info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 22/02/2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA and n-butylpentylone + dimethylsulfone 

The result is consistent with a mixture of MDMA, n-butylpentylone and a body-safe filler dimethylsulfone. n-butylpentylone is a newly developed substituted cathinone that carries unpredictable effects. There is little information about the toxicity, effects, and abuse potential of these substances due to the novelty and extremely short history of human uses. Consumption of these particular substances has been associated with hospitalisations in Aotearoa. 

It is strongly advised not to take this sample. If choosing to consume, follow harm reduction practices such as not consuming alone, not redosing, and not consuming with other psychoactive. This sample is most similar to the Pentylone family. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Synthetic Cathinones

Contact Info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 22/02/2024

Substances detected in the sample: Mixture: MDMA + paracetamol + traces of ketamine. Filler is diemthylsulfone 

Click here for more information on MDMA and Ketamine 

Paracetamol can be harmful when taken in large quantities and can cause liver damage and death if taken beyond the maximum recommended dosage (for adults: no more than 4 grams in 24 hours). If you choose to take this substance, avoid combining it with alcohol, as it makes liver damage much more likely to occur. If you realise you’ve taken too much, or you experience a severe allergic reaction, unexpected abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, yellow skin/eyes or extreme confusion or sleepiness, call 111 immediately and seek medical support.

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 22/02/2024

Substances detected in the sample: Mixture: MDMA+ traces of ketamine

Click here for more information on MDMA and Ketamine 

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 22/02/2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA+ Agar (filler)

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using MDMA.

 Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 23/2/2024

Substances detected in the sample:  Eutylone 

The only substance detected in this sample was Eutylone - a moderately risky synthetic cathinone (also known as bath salts). Eutylone may produce similar desirable effects as other stimulants, but can peak and run out much sooner than the presumed drug. The side effects of this drug are usually more intense than for MDMA, and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, and intense anxiety and agitation. This drug creates a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. half of the amount you might take of MDMA), not using alone, or combining it with other substances.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Synthetic Cathinones

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing:  23/02/24

Substances detected in the sample: Cyputylone

The only substance detected in this sample was Cyputylone - a moderately risky synthetic cathinone (also known as bath salts). Cyputylone may produce similar desirable effects as other stimulants, but can peak and run out much sooner than the presumed drug. The side effects of this drug are usually more intense than for MDMA, and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, and intense anxiety and agitation. This drug creates a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. 1/6th of the amount you might take of MDMA), not using alone, or combining it with other substances.

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Synthetic Cathinones

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 23/02/2024

Substances detected in the sample: Mephtetramine (MTTA)+ Caffeine + N-Ethylpentylone

Little is known about Mephtetramine (MTTA), user reports indicate mostly unpleasant side effects at 50mg dose, n-ethylpentylone is a high risk cathinone that has caused over a dozen hospitalisations in recent years. N-Ethylpentylone may produce similar desirable effects as other stimulants, but these are likely to peak and run out much sooner than better-known drugs. The side effects of this drug are likely to be much more intense than for MDMA (which it may be sold / represented as), and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, intense anxiety and agitation, overheating, seizure and in severe cases, death. These cathinone drugs create a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and experience an ‘over-amping’ type overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. starting with 1/10th of the amount you might take of MDMA), and to avoid taking it without a trusted person present or combining it with other substances.

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: LSD

Date brought in for testing: 24/2/2024

Substances detected in the sample: Lysergide (LSD)

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using LSD. 

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: Cocaine

Date brought in for testing: 24/2/2024

Substances detected in the sample: Cocaine

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Cocaine. 

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 24/2/2024

Substances detected in the sample: Dimethylpentylone

The only substance detected in this sample was Dimethylpentylone - a moderately risky synthetic cathinone (also known as bath salts). Dimethylpentylone may produce similar desirable effects as other stimulants, but can peak and run out much sooner than the presumed drug. The side effects of this drug are usually more intense than for MDMA, and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, and intense anxiety and agitation. This drug creates a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. 1/5th of the amount you might take of MDMA), not using alone, or combining it with other substances. 

Click here for more information on how to be safer when using Synthetic Cathinones

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance Presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: 23/02/2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA + traces of dimethylpentylone

MDMA was the primary ingredient with traces of Dimthylpentylone- a moderately risky synthetic cathinone (also known as bath salts). Dimethylpentylone may produce similar desirable effects as other stimulants but can peak and run out much sooner than the presumed drug. The side effects of this drug are usually more intense than for MDMA, and can include being stuck awake for multiple days, and intense anxiety and agitation. This drug creates a strong urge to re-dose (take more), which can very quickly cause someone to take too much and overdose. If you choose to take this substance, we recommend taking a lower dose (e.g. 1/5th of the amount you might take of MDMA), not using alone, or combining it with other substances.

Be aware of the chocolate chip cookie effect the traces of Cathinone may be more prevalent in other parts of the batch. 

Contact info@knowyourstuff.nz for questions 

Substance presumed to be: MDMA

Date brought in for testing: Last week of February, 2024

Substances detected in the sample: MDMA

This sample was consistent with the presence of MDMA. A single dose of MDMA is typically approximately 80-120 mg (depending on your body). High doses of MDMA greatly increase the risk of side effects, and risk of interactions with other drugs or medications you may be taking.

Click here for more information on staying safer when taking MDMA. 

Contact: DISC Drug Checking team drugchecking@nznep.org.nz or 0273150929

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Call the New Zealand Drug Foundation if you want to anonymously talk through these results on (04) 801 6303.

 

Please note that some samples are still currently being tested.